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MEDIATION & ARBITRATION

When to use Alternative Dispute Resolution

We like to use both Mediation and Arbitration in family law cases.

With Mediation we usually prepare almost as if we were going to trial. The worst that can happen is that we are unable to settle the case and at least have some idea of what the other side is looking for as we prepare for trial. The best that can happen is that we settle the case and save you the expense of a trial and the uncertainty of a decision by the Judge, who may misunderstand the evidence or just not see the evidence our way.

Mediation is frequently used by separating or already separated parties to negotiate the terms of their legal separation. These terms include child custody and visitation matters, child support, property division, post separation support and alimony, and other matters relating to their marital separation.

Mediation is a structured negotiation which is moderated by a “neutral” party whom we refer to as a mediator. The mediator’s purpose is to facilitate open and positive discussion which may lead to agreement on difficult issues. However, the mediator can not render a decision on any matters upon which the parties disagree. Any agreement reached in mediation must be formalized according to legal requirements to make it enforceable.

We also like to use Arbitration, which unlike Mediation involves presentation of evidence to an arbitrator who then issues an “award”, or decision, on the issues presented for Arbitration. Even though we must pay the arbitrator for his or her services, we can usually get the case finished more quickly and efficiently than would be possible by trial in the courtroom.

Arbitration is a process whereby the parties submit contested issues to a “neutral” who we refer to an “arbitrator”. The arbitrator serves as a privately selected “judge”, and rules upon the issues submitted for arbitration under a written arbitration agreement. The agreement may call for expedited procedures for presenting exhibits and other evidence, and the parties may opt to modify the traditional rules of evidence and procedure which would otherwise apply in a traditional Court proceeding.

Even though the parties still must pay attorney’s fees and the arbitrator’s fee, financial savings may be accomplished and time saved through the expedited procedures and modified rules in an arbitration proceeding. Arbitration can also be completed more quickly than would be possible through the traditional Court process.

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“During difficult and uncertain times, Bill navigated our family with confidence and concern. I feel that our family was a top concern for Bill; at every turn he considered all aspects and guided us appropriately. Bill’s professionalism and high moral conduct in court kept my family looking forward to the positive conclusion he provided.”

John P.

“His advice regarding the law and how to negotiate with the opposing party was clear and effective, and Bill listened to my daughter’s desires and was understanding as to the direction she wanted to take things – and then provided his thoughts and suggestions. I would not hesitate to recommend Bill Rogers to anyone.”

Karen V.

“I have been very fortunate to have Bill Rogers as my attorney. Mr. Rogers is extremely professional, knowledgeable, assertive, and tactful. His staff was incredibly skilled and efficient. It made me feel comfortable and confident knowing that I was surrounded by friends. I am extremely grateful for all he has done for me.”

Ilona H.

“I have known Bill Rogers for over 10 years and his ability to operate both strategically and tactically are the skills and qualities that first come to mind. He can efficiently handle multiple complex tasks and has proved to be an invaluable resource to me. He has represented me in both a divorce and in my business and has been able to overcome many challenges and obstacles to my satisfaction.”

Leonard S.

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